MOVEMENT

BASICS OF THE DEADLIFT


Often we forget how many times per day we need to bend over and pick something up... which we can agree is a deadlift right? So imagine if we're complacent with how we move in the gym. We can be sure that we'll revert to patterns where we are used to picking up things that are light. It's a surefire way to end up injured. Here are our deadlift basics - the non-negotiable, simple way to get strong and not get hurt.

3 EXERCISES TO BUILD SINGLE-LEG STABILITY


We can agree single-leg movements are cornerstones of any decent movement program - they are called 'unilateral' exercises. 'Uni' means one, and 'lateral' means side - so 'one-side'. They correct imbalances, build greater levels of strength, improve coordination and allow neuro-muscular connections to grow. So then we need to look at how we develop the single-leg balance from the start.

DOES YOUR CORE FEEL WEAK?


Do you find that your core feels weak? Maybe you've never learnt how to properly engage it, maybe after having kids it's not as strong, or maybe your breathing is wrong. Whatever the cause, it's vital to strengthen it and learn to properly brace. Think of your core as the link between your lower and upper body - that's kind of a big deal. A few things that play into are: foot function, hip position, breathing, posture, and muscle engagement. Today we are covering the breathing and bracing component in a practical way.

THE MOST COMMON PUSH UP FAULTS


Often in a Push-Up people will feel it more in the shoulders, rather than the chest and triceps. Now, performing the movement with flared elbows has its place. However, most of the time we look for elbows to be tucked in and the shoulders pushed down and back. Here are some simple fixes to transfer the working muscles.

ENGAGE YOUR GLUTES IN 2 MINUTES


Squatting, deadlifting, glute bridging and just moving, in general, require high glute engagement. They are a major working muscle group, as well as a primary stabiliser. But what happens if you don't feel them when you are trying to work them? The most likely cause is either poor hip positioning or sitting for long periods of time every day. Correcting the engagement is vital to your progress - whether that's aesthetics, strength, moving freely or speed.

HOW TO BREATHE OPTIMALLY PART 1


Breathing incorrectly can be the root of many ailments as well as stagnation in progress in strength and conditioning. It can cause postural issues, a never-ending stress response, bad sleep, and a multitude of other nasty symptoms. I know what you're probably thinking... I've been breathing for this many years and you're trying to tell me it's wrong? Not necessarily. Bad breathing patterns can start anywhere, from trauma, sport, or when you first got a blocked nose as a child.

HOW TO BREATHE OPTIMALLY PART 2


Now that you're clued in with whether you are a chest or belly breather - let's cover how to make the air start to flow like you're pouring into a jug of water.

HOW TO BREATHE OPTIMALLY PART 3


Now that you can breathe efficiently and optimally, we are going to teach you how to use it to brace better.

HOW BREATHING CONTROLS MUSCLE TENSION


Chronically tight hamstrings, hips, lower back, shoulders, and neck often stem from damaging breathing, which activates our fight or flight response. When this happens our muscle seems to 'seize', a no matter how much stretching you do it doesn't make much of a difference. You're not crazy, you just need to look at tension differently. Today we cover a test and retest to show you just how much of a role it plays.

3 LOWER BACK STRETCHES TO RELIEVE PAIN AND TIGHTNESS


Stretching doesn't often target the root cause of tightness or tension. We need to go deeper into movement patterns and breathing to find that out. However, it can provide great temporary relief and some smaller long-term effects. The lower back is one of the most commonly tight muscle groups, only exceeded by the neck and shoulder regions.

THE BEST EXERCISE FOR CORE STABILITY


These are the king in terms of core stability, hip positioning, and glute engagement. Bird-Dogs are ideally incorporated into warm-up sequences to prime movement patterns before the main movement for the day. They are beneficial for people who struggle with lower back tension.

CAN YOU WORKOUT WITH AN INJURY?


The likelihood of sustaining an injury over your active life, whether it be small or large, is high. Does that have to mean not moving for 2 weeks to 6 months? Absolutely not. But will your movement have to change? Definitely. When we modify for injuries, there is a specific process that ensures you are both gaining benefits as well as staying safe. It may be frustrating at times, but it is important to remember that your goals have shifted for a small period in time.

NEWBIE GAINS


For people who have not been exposed to structured strength, conditioning, or skill environments previously, they will often experience what we coined as 'Newbie Gains'. This is a period of about 6 months where rapid progression occurs. This is due to both muscular and nervous system adaptation. This is an important period to leverage to increase the movement ability baseline. However, if you aren't aware of this, it can be easy to get caught thinking you have just plateaued. A similar trend occurs again between months 6 and 18, followed by another decrease in the rate of progression.

HOW MANY TIMES SHOULD YOU TRAIN IN A WEEK?


The simple answer is 3-4 times per week, with movement and recovery placed on every day in between. This ensures optimal strength and conditioning gain while allowing the body to move the way it was designed to in an active sense.

HOW TO CORRECT HIP POSITIONING IN 2 STEPS


Over-accentuated hip positioning in either direction can cause a mass of issues and a whole lot of pain. Back pain, tight neck, tight hamstrings, inability to squat properly, pain in deadlifts, and the list goes on. SO, what do we do? First, we find the ends of the spectrum, then a neutral balance point.

WHAT IS THE ROLE OF A COACH?


The simple answer is 3-4 times per week, with movement and recovery placed on every day in between. This ensures optimal strength and conditioning gain while allowing the body to move the way it was designed to in an active sense.